Ascension – On Exhibiting

Ascension, Work in Progress, Oil on Canvas, 100 x 150cm

I miss people and I miss exhibiting. The social aspect of art is a big part of the creative process and I miss it. 

In April I was due to have a one woman exhibition but like so many other things a Covid fall-out.  I was looking forward an arty party in a castle – an opportunity to see old friends and meet new people. A chance to dress up and be a social butterfly. What could be better? Making art is a solitary business. 

Solipsism questions whether art or indeed anything exist unless looked at? Do my paintings exist stacked in my studio? They are certainly not alive in anyone’s minds or life carefully stored in neat rows. A castle’s worth of artwork locked in turret! There is no sharing of energy, inspiration, passion or joy if the work is not seen.

So, by extension, do I exist painting alone in a ‘turret’ in South Lanarkshire, Scotland? 

To be an artist is perhaps to be Schrodinger’s Cat, both dead and alive simultaneously. Van Gogh’s sunflowers are alive in everyone’s minds. You can visualise his work this moment with ease. His living presence is palpable in both the brilliance of his brushstrokes and your mind right now, yet he is dead. 

To be an artist is the only job in the world where people talk about you dying when buying. Surmising your art will be worth a fortune when you pop your clogs. I always laugh. It seems like the best thing to do. 

Yet paintings do seem to gather energy by being looked at. It’s hard to explain. It’s as though the presence of the artwork is increased or revealed by the viewer’s gaze on it. The more a painting draws a person in, the better it seems to have succeeded as a living entity. The more a painting is looked at the more it seems to gather energy. 

As an artist, meeting people energises and inspires. So many amazing encounters at exhibitions, lasting friendships made, insights shared, stories told, laughter enjoyed. I learn about my artwork from you, from what you notice, what you say, how you react. I miss it. I miss you. It’s a really important part of making art. Without it the creativity process feels incomplete, like cooking a delicious meal and then not eating it. It’s the reason I organise a yearly community exhibition for local artists too. I need the input of people.

I guess like many people I too feel a little lost right now or perhaps just a little philosophical. This blog offers no conclusions as to what happens next. I just wanted to say I miss you. I miss meeting people. I miss spontaneous interactions and conversations and I miss exhibiting. Perhaps it is a strange thing to say in this world of ‘everything is online!’

Meantime, my default position is – paint, for this too shall pass! I am so grateful to have painting.

Stay safe and hopefully see you soon! 

Love Kirsten 

www.kirstenharrisart.co.uk

Share Button